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Missouri Revised Statutes Title XXXV. Civil Procedure and Limitations § 510.050. Request for admission of genuineness of relevant documents

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1. At any time after the pleadings are closed, a party may serve upon any other party a written request for the admission by the latter of the genuineness of any relevant documents described in and exhibited with the request or of the truth of any relevant matters of fact pertaining to such documents set forth in the written request.  Copies of the documents shall be delivered with the request unless copies have already been furnished.  Each of the matters of which an admission is requested shall be deemed admitted unless, within a period designated in the request, not less than ten days after service thereof or within such further time as the court may allow on motion and notice, the party to whom the request is directed serves upon the party requesting the admission a sworn statement either denying specifically the matters of which an admission is requested or setting forth in detail the reasons why he cannot truthfully either admit or deny those matters.

2. Any admission made by a party pursuant to such request is for the purpose of the pending action only and neither constitutes an admission by him for any other purpose nor may it be used against him in any other proceeding.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - Missouri Revised Statutes Title XXXV. Civil Procedure and Limitations § 510.050. Request for admission of genuineness of relevant documents - last updated January 01, 2018 | https://codes.findlaw.com/mo/title-xxxv-civil-procedure-and-limitations/mo-rev-st-510-050/


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