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Minnesota Statutes Metropolitan Area (Ch. 473-473J) § 473F.13. Change in status of municipality

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Subdivision 1. Certification of change in status.  If a municipality is dissolved, is consolidated with all or part of another municipality, annexes territory, has a portion of its territory detached from it, or is newly incorporated, the secretary of state shall immediately certify that fact to the commissioner of revenue.  The secretary of state shall also certify to the commissioner of revenue the current population of the new, enlarged, or successor municipality, if determined by the chief administrative law judge of the state Office of Administrative Hearings incident to consolidation, annexation, or incorporation proceedings.  The population so certified shall govern for purposes of sections 473F.01 to 473F.13 until the Metropolitan Council files its first population estimate as of a later date with the commissioner of revenue.  If an annexation of unincorporated land occurs without proceedings before the chief administrative law judge, the population of the annexing municipality as previously determined shall continue to govern for purposes of sections 473F.01 to 473F.13 until the Metropolitan Council files its first population estimate as of a later date with the commissioner of revenue.

Subds. 2, 3. Repealed by Laws 1991, c. 291, art. 1, § 63.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - Minnesota Statutes Metropolitan Area (Ch. 473-473J) § 473F.13. Change in status of municipality - last updated January 01, 2018 | https://codes.findlaw.com/mn/metropolitan-area-ch-473-473j/mn-st-sect-473f-13/


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