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Washington Revised Code Title 9A. Washington Criminal Code § 9A.52.100. Vehicle prowling in the second degree

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(1)?A person is guilty of vehicle prowling in the second degree if, with intent to commit a crime against a person or property therein, he or she enters or remains unlawfully in a vehicle other than a motor home, as defined in RCW 46.04.305, or a vessel equipped for propulsion by mechanical means or by sail which has a cabin equipped with permanently installed sleeping quarters or cooking facilities.

(2)?Except as provided in subsection (3) of this section, vehicle prowling in the second degree is a gross misdemeanor.

(3)?Vehicle prowling in the second degree is a class C felony upon a third or subsequent conviction of vehicle prowling in the second degree. ?A third or subsequent conviction means that a person has been previously convicted at least two separate occasions of the crime of vehicle prowling in the second degree.

(4)?Multiple counts of vehicle prowling (a) charged in the same charging document do not count as separate offenses for the purposes of charging as a felony based on previous convictions for vehicle prowling in the second degree and (b) based on the same date of occurrence do not count as separate offenses for the purposes of charging as a felony based on previous convictions for vehicle prowling in the second degree.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - Washington Revised Code Title 9A. Washington Criminal Code § 9A.52.100. Vehicle prowling in the second degree - last updated April 06, 2022 | https://codes.findlaw.com/wa/title-9a-washington-criminal-code/wa-rev-code-9a-52-100.html


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