29 U.S.C. § 141 - U.S. Code - Unannotated Title 29. Labor § 141. Short title;  Congressional declaration of purpose and policy

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(a) This chapter may be cited as the “Labor Management Relations Act, 1947”.

(b) Industrial strife which interferes with the normal flow of commerce and with the full production of articles and commodities for commerce, can be avoided or substantially minimized if employers, employees, and labor organizations each recognize under law one another's legitimate rights in their relations with each other, and above all recognize under law that neither party has any right in its relations with any other to engage in acts or practices which jeopardize the public health, safety, or interest.

It is the purpose and policy of this chapter, in order to promote the full flow of commerce, to prescribe the legitimate rights of both employees and employers in their relations affecting commerce, to provide orderly and peaceful procedures for preventing the interference by either with the legitimate rights of the other, to protect the rights of individual employees in their relations with labor organizations whose activities affect commerce, to define and proscribe practices on the part of labor and management which affect commerce and are inimical to the general welfare, and to protect the rights of the public in connection with labor disputes affecting commerce.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - 29 U.S.C. § 141 - U.S. Code - Unannotated Title 29. Labor § 141. Short title;  Congressional declaration of purpose and policy - last updated January 01, 2018 | https://codes.findlaw.com/us/title-29-labor/29-usc-sect-141.html


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