Pennsylvania Statutes Title 20 Pa.C.S.A. Decedents, Estates and Fiduciaries § 3311. Possession of real and personal estate;  exception

(a) Personal representative.--A personal representative shall have the right to and shall take possession of, maintain and administer all the real and personal estate of the decedent, except real estate occupied at the time of death by an heir or devisee with the consent of the decedent.  He shall collect the rents and income from each asset in his possession until it is sold or distributed, and, during the administration of the estate, shall have the right to maintain any action with respect to it and shall make all reasonable expenditures necessary to preserve it.  The court may direct the personal representative to take possession of, administer and maintain real estate so occupied by an heir or a devisee if this is necessary to protect the rights of claimants or other parties.  Nothing in this section shall affect the personal representative's power to sell real estate occupied by an heir or devisee.

(b) Redevelopment authority.--A redevelopment authority granted letters of administration shall have the power to take, clear, combine or transfer title to real property of the estate as necessary to return such property to productive use and, upon payment of fair market value of the property in its current state, to the estate.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - Pennsylvania Statutes Title 20 Pa.C.S.A. Decedents, Estates and Fiduciaries § 3311. Possession of real and personal estate;  exception - last updated January 01, 2019 | https://codes.findlaw.com/pa/title-20-pacsa-decedents-estates-and-fiduciaries/pa-csa-sect-20-3311.html


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