Pennsylvania Statutes Title 18 Pa.C.S.A. Crimes and Offenses § 3701. Robbery

(a) Offense defined.--

(1) A person is guilty of robbery if, in the course of committing a theft, he:

(i) inflicts serious bodily injury upon another;

(ii) threatens another with or intentionally puts him in fear of immediate serious bodily injury;

(iii) commits or threatens immediately to commit any felony of the first or second degree;

(iv) inflicts bodily injury upon another or threatens another with or intentionally puts him in fear of immediate bodily injury;

(v) physically takes or removes property from the person of another by force however slight;  or

(vi) takes or removes the money of a financial institution without the permission of the financial institution by making a demand of an employee of the financial institution orally or in writing with the intent to deprive the financial institution thereof.

(2) An act shall be deemed “in the course of committing a theft” if it occurs in an attempt to commit theft or in flight after the attempt or commission.

(3) For purposes of this subsection, a “financial institution” means a bank, trust company, savings trust, credit union or similar institution.

(b) Grading.--

(1) Except as provided under paragraph (2), robbery under subsection (a)(1)(iv) and (vi) is a felony of the second degree;  robbery under subsection (a)(1)(v) is a felony of the third degree;  otherwise, it is a felony of the first degree.

(2) If the object of a robbery under paragraph (1) is a controlled substance or designer drug as those terms are defined in section 2 of the act of April 14, 1972 (P.L. 233, No. 64),   1 known as The Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act, robbery is a felony of the first degree.

1 35 P.S. § 780-102.

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