New Mexico Territorial Laws and Treaties NM TREATIES GADSDEN TREATY, Proclamation By the President of the United States of Americaa Proclamation

WHEREAS, A treaty between the United States of America and the Mexican republic was concluded and signed at the city of Mexico on the thirtieth day of December, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-three; which treaty, as amended by the senate of the United States, and being in the English and Spanish languages, is word for word as follows:

IN THE NAME OF ALMIGHTY GOD:

The republic of Mexico and the United States of America, desiring to remove every cause of disagreement which might interfere in any manner with the better friendship and intercourse between the two countries, and especially in respect to the true limits which should be established, when, notwithstanding what was covenanted in the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in the year 1848, opposite interpretations have been urged, which might give occasion to questions of serious moment: to avoid these, and to strengthen and more firmly maintain the peace which happily prevails between the two republics, the president of the United States has, for this purpose, appointed James Gadsden, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of the same, near the Mexican government, and the president of Mexico has appointed as plenipotentiary “ad hoc” his excellency Don Manual Diez de Bonilla, cavalier grand cross of the national and distinguished order of Guadalupe, and secretary of state, and of the office of foreign relations, and Don Jose Salazar Ylarregui and General Mariano Monterde as scientific commissioners, invested with full powers for this negotiation, who, having communicated their respective full powers, and finding them in due and proper form, have agreed upon the articles following:


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