North Dakota Century Code Title 30.1. Uniform Probate Code § 30.1-04-18. (2-119) Parent-child relationship--Adoptee and adoptee's genetic parents

1. Except as otherwise provided in subsections 2 through 4, a parent-child relationship does not exist between an adoptee and the adoptee's genetic parents.

2. A parent-child relationship exists between an individual who is adopted by the spouse of either genetic parent and:

a. The genetic parent whose spouse adopted the individual;  and

b. The other genetic parent, but only for purposes of the right of the adoptee or a descendant of the adoptee to inherit from or through the other genetic parent.

3. A parent-child relationship exists between both genetic parents and an individual who is adopted by a relative of a genetic parent, or by the spouse or surviving spouse of a relative of a genetic parent, but only for purposes of the right of the adoptee or a descendant of the adoptee to inherit from or through either genetic parent.

4. A parent-child relationship exists between both genetic parents and an individual who is adopted after the death of both genetic parents, but only for purposes of the right of the adoptee or a descendant of the adoptee to inherit through either genetic parent.

5. If, after a parent-child relationship is established between a child of assisted reproduction and a parent or parents under section 30.1-04-19 or between a gestational child and a parent or parents under section 30.1-04-20 , the child is adopted by another or others, the child's parent or parents under section 30.1-04-19 or 30.1-04-20 are deemed the child's genetic parent or parents for purposes of this section.


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