Montana Title 61. Motor Vehicles § 61-8-711. Violation of chapter--penalty

(1) It is a misdemeanor for a person to violate any of the provisions of this chapter unless the violation is declared to be a felony.

(2) Each person convicted of a misdemeanor for a violation of any of the provisions of this chapter for which another penalty is not provided shall for a first conviction be punished by a fine of not less than $10 or more than $100. For a second conviction within 1 year after the first conviction, the person shall be punished by a fine of not less than $25 or more than $200. Upon a third or subsequent conviction within 1 year after the first conviction, the person shall be punished by a fine of not less than $50 or more than $500.

(3) Except as provided in subsection (4), failure to pay a fine imposed under this chapter is a civil contempt of the court. On failure of payment of a fine, the court may:

(a) order enforcement of the fine by execution in the manner provided in 25-13-204 and under the provisions of Title 25, chapter 13;  or

(b) if the court finds that the person is unable to pay, order the person to perform community service.

(4) If property is not found in an amount necessary to satisfy the unpaid portion of the fine and if the court makes a written finding that community service is inappropriate, the person shall be imprisoned in the county jail in the county in which the offense was committed, and the imprisonment shall be the number of days that the fine is divisible by the dollar amount of the incarceration credit contained in 46-18-403 .

(5) Upon conviction, the court costs or any part of the court costs may be assessed against the defendant in the discretion of the court.


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