Minnesota Statutes Insurance (Ch. 59A-79a) § 65B.55. Application for benefits under plan of security




Subdivision 1. Claim notification.  A plan of reparation security may prescribe a period of not less than six months after the date of accident within which an insured or any other person entitled to claim basic economic loss benefits, or anyone acting on their behalf, must notify the reparation obligor or its agent, of the accident and the possibility of a claim for economic loss benefits.  Failure to provide notice will not render a person ineligible to receive benefits unless actual prejudice is shown by the reparation obligor, and then only to the extent of the prejudice.  The notice may be given in any reasonable fashion.

Subd. 2. Disability or treatment lapses.  A plan of reparation security may provide that in any instance where a lapse occurs in the period of disability or in the medical treatment of a person with respect to whose injury basic economic loss benefits have been paid and a person subsequently claims additional benefits based upon an alleged recurrence of the injury for which the original claim for benefits was made, the obligor may require reasonable medical proof of such alleged recurrence;  provided, that in no event shall the aggregate benefits payable to any person exceed the maximum limits specified in the plan of security, and provided further that such coverages may contain a provision terminating eligibility for benefits after a prescribed period of lapse of disability and medical treatment, which period shall not be less than one year.





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