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District of Columbia Code Division IV. Criminal Law and Procedure and Prisoners. § 22-711. Definitions.

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For the purposes of this subchapter, the term:

(1)??Court of the District of Columbia? means the Superior Court of the District of Columbia or the District of Columbia Court of Appeals.

(2)??Juror? means any grand, petit, or other juror, or any person selected or summoned as a prospective juror of the District of Columbia.

(3)??Official action? means any decision, opinion, recommendation, judgment, vote, or other conduct that involves an exercise of discretion on the part of the public servant.

(4)??Official duty? means any required conduct that does not involve an exercise of discretion on the part of the public servant.

(5)??Official proceeding? means any trial, hearing, investigation, or other proceeding in a court of the District of Columbia or conducted by the Council of the District of Columbia or an agency or department of the District of Columbia government, or a grand jury proceeding.

(6)??Public servant? means any officer, employee, or other person authorized to act for or on behalf of the District of Columbia government. ?The term ?public servant? includes any person who has been elected, nominated, or appointed to be a public servant or a juror. ?The term ?public servant? does not include an independent contractor.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - District of Columbia Code Division IV. Criminal Law and Procedure and Prisoners. § 22-711. Definitions. - last updated January 01, 2020 | https://codes.findlaw.com/dc/division-iv-criminal-law-and-procedure-and-prisoners/dc-code-sect-22-711.html


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