District of Columbia Code Division II. Judiciary and Judicial Procedure § 15-102. Lien of judgment, decree, or forfeited recognizance.

(a) Each --

(1) final judgment or decree for the payment of money rendered in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, or the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, from the date such judgment or decree is filed and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds of the District of Columbia, and

(2) recognizance taken by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, or the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, from the date the entry or order of forfeiture of such recognizance is filed and recorded in the office of the Recorder of Deeds of the District of Columbia,

shall constitute a lien on all the freehold and leasehold estates, legal and equitable, of the defendants bound by such judgment, decree, or recognizance, in any land, tenements, or hereditaments in the District of Columbia, whether the estates are in possession or are reversions or remainders, vested or contingent.  Such liens on equitable interest may be enforced only by an action to foreclose.

(b) Liens created as provided by this section continue as long as the judgment, decree, or recognizance is in force or until it is satisfied or discharged.

(c) This section shall not apply to any property that is owned by the District government or by any independent agency or instrumentality of the District government, nor to any property in which the District government or any independent agency or instrumentality of the District government has an interest, to the extent of that interest.


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