California Code, Revenue and Taxation Code - RTC § 110

(a) Except as is otherwise provided in Section 110.1 , “full cash value” or “fair market value” means the amount of cash or its equivalent that property would bring if exposed for sale in the open market under conditions in which neither buyer nor seller could take advantage of the exigencies of the other, and both the buyer and the seller have knowledge of all of the uses and purposes to which the property is adapted and for which it is capable of being used, and of the enforceable restrictions upon those uses and purposes.

(b) For purposes of determining the “full cash value” or “fair market value” of real property, other than possessory interests, being appraised upon a purchase, “full cash value” or “fair market value” is the purchase price paid in the transaction unless it is established by a preponderance of the evidence that the real property would not have transferred for that purchase price in an open market transaction.  The purchase price shall, however, be rebuttably presumed to be the “full cash value” or “fair market value” if the terms of the transaction were negotiated at arms length between a knowledgeable transferor and transferee neither of which could take advantage of the exigencies of the other. “Purchase price,” as used in this section, means the total consideration provided by the purchaser or on the purchaser's behalf, valued in money, whether paid in money or otherwise.  There is a rebuttable presumption that the value of improvements financed by the proceeds of an assessment resulting in a lien imposed on the property by a public entity is reflected in the total consideration, exclusive of that lien amount, involved in the transaction.  This presumption may be overcome if the assessor establishes by a preponderance of the evidence that all or a portion of the value of those improvements is not reflected in that consideration.  If a single transaction results in a change in ownership of more than one parcel of real property, the purchase price shall be allocated among those parcels and other assets, if any, transferred based on the relative fair market value of each.

(c) For real property, other than possessory interests, the change of ownership statement required pursuant to Section 480 , 480.1 , or 480.2 , or the preliminary change of ownership statement required pursuant to Section 480.4 , shall give any information as the board shall prescribe relative to whether the terms of the transaction were negotiated at “arms length.”  In the event that the transaction includes property other than real property, the change in ownership statement shall give information as the board shall prescribe disclosing the portion of the purchase price that is allocable to all elements of the transaction.  If the taxpayer fails to provide the prescribed information, the rebuttable presumption provided by subdivision (b) shall not apply.

(d) Except as provided in subdivision (e), for purposes of determining the “full cash value” or “fair market value” of any taxable property, all of the following shall apply:

(1) The value of intangible assets and rights relating to the going concern value of a business using taxable property shall not enhance or be reflected in the value of the taxable property.

(2) If the principle of unit valuation is used to value properties that are operated as a unit and the unit includes intangible assets and rights, then the fair market value of the taxable property contained within the unit shall be determined by removing from the value of the unit the fair market value of the intangible assets and rights contained within the unit.

(3) The exclusive nature of a concession, franchise, or similar agreement, whether de jure or de facto, is an intangible asset that shall not enhance the value of taxable property, including real property.

(e) Taxable property may be assessed and valued by assuming the presence of intangible assets or rights necessary to put the taxable property to beneficial or productive use.

(f) For purposes of determining the “full cash value” or “fair market value” of real property, intangible attributes of real property shall be reflected in the value of the real property.  These intangible attributes of real property include zoning, location, and other attributes that relate directly to the real property involved.


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