Arizona Constitution Art. VI § 35. Continuance in office;  continued existence of offices;  application of prior statute and rules

Section 35 . A. All justices, judges, justices of the peace and officers of any court who are holding office as such by election or appointment at the time of the adoption of this section shall serve or continue in office for the respective terms for which they are so elected or for their respective unexpired terms, and until their successors are elected or appointed and qualify or they are retained in office pursuant to § 38 of this article;  provided, however, that any justice or judge elected at the general election at which this section is adopted shall serve for the term for which he is so elected.  The continued existence of any office heretofore legally established or held shall not be abolished or repealed by the adoption of this article.  The statutes and rules relating to the authority, jurisdiction, practice and procedure of courts, judicial officers and offices in force at the time of the adoption of this article and not inconsistent herewith, shall, so far as applicable, apply to and govern such courts, judicial officers and offices until amended or repealed.

B. All judges of the superior court holding office by appointment or retention in counties with a population of two hundred fifty thousand persons or more according to the most recent United States census at the time of the adoption of this amendment to this section shall serve or continue in office for the respective terms for which they were appointed.  Upon an incumbent vacating the office of judge of the superior court, whether by failing to file a declaration for retention, by rejection by the qualified electors of the county or resignation, the appointment shall be pursuant to § 37 of this article.


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