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Alaska Statutes Title 34. Property § 34.20.070. Sale by trustee

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(a)?If a deed of trust is executed conveying real property located in the state to a trustee as security for the payment of an indebtedness and the deed provides that in case of default or noncompliance with the terms of the trust, the trustee may sell the property for condition broken, the trustee, in addition to the right of foreclosure and sale, may execute the trust by sale of the property, upon the conditions and in the manner set forth in the deed of trust, without first securing a decree of foreclosure and order of sale from the court, if the trustee has complied with the notice requirements of (b) of this section. ?If the deed of trust is foreclosed judicially or the note secured by the deed of trust is sued on and a judgment is obtained by the beneficiary, the beneficiary may not exercise the nonjudicial remedies described in this section.

(b)?Not less than 30 days after the default and not less than 90 days before the sale, the trustee shall record in the office of the recorder of the recording district in which the trust property is located a notice of default setting out (1) the name of the trustor, (2) the book and page where the trust deed is recorded or the serial number assigned to the trust deed by the recorder, (3) a description of the trust property, including the property's street address if there is a street address for the property, (4) a statement that a breach of the obligation for which the deed of trust is security has occurred, (5) the nature of the breach, (6) the sum owing on the obligation, (7) the election by the trustee to sell the property to satisfy the obligation, (8) the date, time, and place of the sale, and (9) the statement described in (e) of this section describing conditions for curing the default. ?An inaccuracy in the street address may not be used to set aside a sale if the legal description is correct. ?At any time before the sale date stated in the notice of default or to which the sale is postponed under AS 34.20.080(e), if the default has arisen by failure to make payments required by the trust deed, the default may be cured and sale under this section terminated by payment of the sum then in default, other than the principal that would not then be due if no default had occurred, and attorney and other foreclosure fees and costs actually incurred by the beneficiary and trustee due to the default. ?If, under the same trust deed, notice of default under this subsection has been recorded two or more times previously and the default has been cured under this subsection, the trustee may elect to refuse payment and continue the sale.

(c)?Within 10 days after recording the notice of default, the trustee shall mail a copy of the notice by certified mail to the last known address of each of the following persons or their legal representatives: ?(1) the trustor in the trust deed; ?(2) the successor in interest to the trustor whose interest appears of record or of whose interest the trustee or the beneficiary has actual notice, or who is in actual physical possession of the property; ?(3) any other person actually in physical possession of the property; ?(4) any person having a lien or interest subsequent to the interest of the trustee in the trust deed, where the lien or interest appears of record or where the trustee or the beneficiary has actual notice of the lien or interest, except as provided in (f) of this section. ?The notice may be delivered personally instead of by mail.

(d)?If the State of Alaska is a subsequent party, the trustee, in addition to the notice of default, shall give the state a supplemental notice of any state lien existing as of the date of filing the notice of default. ?This notice must set out, with such particularity as reasonably available information will permit, the nature of the state's lien, including the name and address, if known, of the person whose liability created the lien, the amount shown on the lien document, the department of the state government involved, the recording district, and the book and page on which the lien was recorded or the serial number assigned to the lien by the recorder.

(e)?The statement required by (b)(9) of this section must state that, if the default has arisen by failure to make payments required by the trust deed, the default may be cured and the sale under this section terminated if

(1)?payment of the sum then in default, other than the principal that would not then be due if default had not occurred, and attorney and other foreclosure fees and costs actually incurred by the beneficiary and trustee due to the default is made at any time before the sale date stated in the notice of default or to which the sale is postponed; ?and

(2)?when notice of default under (b) of this section has been recorded two or more times previously under the same trust deed and the default has been cured under (b) of this section, the trustee does not elect to refuse payment and continue the sale.

(f)?In (c)(4) of this section, if the existence of a lien or nonpossessory interest can only be inferred from an inspection of the real property, the person holding the lien or nonpossessory interest is not entitled to notice under (c) of this section unless the lien or nonpossessory interest appears of record or a written notice of the lien or nonpossessory interest has been given to the beneficiary or trustee before the recording of the notice of default.

(g)?If the trustee delivers notice personally under (c) of this section to the property or to an occupant of the property, the trustee may, notwithstanding (c) of this section, deliver the notice up to 20 days after the notice of default is recorded. ?If there is not a structure on the property and a person is not present on the property at the time of delivery, the trustee may place the notice on the property, or as close as practicable to the property if

(1)?there is not a practical road access to the property; ?or

(2)?access to the property is restricted by gates or other barriers.

(h)?If the trustee or other person who delivered notice under (g) of this section signs an affidavit for the delivery, the affidavit is prima facie evidence that the trustee complied with (g) of this section. ?After one year from the delivery, as evidenced by the affidavit, the trustee is conclusively presumed to have complied with (g) of this section unless, within one year from the delivery, an action has been filed in court to contest the foreclosure based on failing to comply with (g) of this section.

(i)?If a person who is entitled to receive notice by mail under (c) of this section is known by the beneficiary or trustee to be deceased, the trustee may satisfy the notice requirements of (c) of this section by mailing the notice to the last known address of the deceased person and to the personal representative of the deceased person if the beneficiary or trustee knows that a personal representative has been appointed for the deceased person.

(j)?If a person who is entitled to receive notice by mail under (c) of this section is known by the beneficiary or trustee to be deceased but the trustee and the beneficiary do not know that a personal representative has been appointed for the deceased person, the trustee may satisfy the notice requirements of (c) of this section by

(1)?mailing the notice to the heirs and devisees of the deceased person

(A)?whose names and addresses are known to the beneficiary or trustee; ?or

(B)?who have recorded a notice of their interest in the property; ?and

(2)?publishing and posting the notice of the foreclosure as provided by law for the sale of real property on execution, except that the notice must be titled ?To the Heirs or Devisees of (insert the name of the deceased person)? and include in the body of the notice a list of the names of the persons who are known by the beneficiary or trustee to be the heirs and devisees of the deceased person.

(k)?If notice is given as required by (i) and (j) of this section, an heir or devisee of the deceased person may not challenge the foreclosure on the ground that the heir or devisee did not receive notice of the sale, unless the heir or devisee challenges the foreclosure on this ground within 90 days after the sale.

(l)?A person may bring an action in court to enjoin a foreclosure on real property only if the person is

(1)?the trustor of the deed of trust under which the real property was foreclosed;

(2)?a guarantor of the obligation that the real property is securing;

(3)?a person who has an interest in the real property that has been recorded;

(4)?a person who has a recorded lien against the real property;

(5)?an heir to the real property;

(6)?a devisee of the real property; ?or

(7)?the attorney general acting under other legal authority.

(m)?If a person brings an action under (l) of this section to stop a sale of real property, and if the sale is being brought because of a default in the performance of a nonmonetary obligation required by the deed of trust that the real property is securing, the court may impose on the person the conditions that the court determines are appropriate to protect the beneficiary.

(n)?In this section, ?devisee,? ?heir,? and ?personal representative? have the meanings given in AS 13.06.050.

Cite this article: FindLaw.com - Alaska Statutes Title 34. Property § 34.20.070. Sale by trustee - last updated April 21, 2021 | https://codes.findlaw.com/ak/title-34-property/ak-st-sect-34-20-070.html


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