Alaska Statutes Title 11. Criminal Law § 11.46.740. Criminal use of computer

(a) A person commits the offense of criminal use of a computer if, having no right to do so or any reasonable ground to believe the person has such a right, the person knowingly

(1) accesses, causes to be accessed, or exceeds the person's authorized access to a computer, computer system, computer program, computer network, or any part of a computer system or network, and, as a result of or in the course of that access,

(A) obtains information concerning a person;

(B) introduces false information into a computer, computer system, computer program, or computer network with the intent to damage or enhance the data record or the financial reputation of a person;

(C) introduces false information into a computer, computer system, computer program, or computer network and, with criminal negligence, damages or enhances the data record or the financial reputation of a person;

(D) obtains proprietary information of another person;

(E) obtains information that is only available to the public for a fee;

(F) introduces instructions, a computer program, or other information that tampers with, disrupts, disables, or destroys a computer, computer system, computer program, computer network, or any part of a computer system or network;  or

(G) encrypts or decrypts data;

(2) installs, enables, or uses a keystroke logger or other device or program that has the ability to record another person's keystrokes or entries on a computer;  or

(3) uses a keystroke logger or other device or program to intercept or record another person's keystrokes or entries on a computer when those entries are transmitted wirelessly or by other non-wired means.

(b) In this section, “proprietary information” means scientific, technical, or commercial information, including a design, process, procedure, customer list, supplier list, or customer records that the holder of the information has not made available to the public.

(c) Criminal use of a computer is a class C felony.


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