Wyoming Statutes Title 2. Wills, Decedents' Estates and Probate Code § 2-2-101. Exclusive jurisdiction conferred on district courts




The district courts of the state have exclusive original jurisdiction of all matters relating to the probate and contest of wills and testaments, the granting of letters testamentary and of administration, and the settlement and distribution of decedents' estates.  The court granting the letters has exclusive jurisdiction of all matters touching the settlement and distribution of the estates for which letters have been granted.  The jurisdiction over subject matter of the district court sitting in probate, sometimes referred to in this Title 2 as the “probate court”, is coextensive with the jurisdiction over subject matter of the district court in any civil action.  A decree of distribution entered by the district court in probate, pursuant to W.S. 2-7-807 or 2-7-813, shall be a final determination of title as to assets described therein, as to all distributees served with notice, or who have waived notice, of the hearing provided for in W.S. 2-7-807 or 2-7-811, as the case may be.  As to all other parties, an action may be brought and maintained at any time prior to the entry of final decree of distribution under W.S. 2-7-813, by or against the personal representative in the district court, sitting in probate, seeking any legal or equitable remedy as to any interest in property, real or personal, in which the estate asserts or claims any interest.  In addition, all causes cognizable in the district court in any civil action may be brought and maintained, at any time prior to the entry of final decree of distribution under W.S. 2-7-813, by or against a personal representative in the district court sitting in probate which granted the letters to the personal representative.


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