48 U.S.C. § 1661 - U.S. Code - Unannotated Title 48. Territories and Insular Possessions § 1661. Islands of Tutuila, Manua, and eastern Samoa




Ceded to and accepted by United States

The cessions by certain chiefs of the islands of Tutuila and Manua and certain other islands of the Samoan group lying between the thirteenth and fifteenth degrees of latitude south of the Equator and between the one hundred and sixty-seventh and one hundred and seventy-first degrees of longitude west of Greenwich, herein referred to as the islands of eastern Samoa, are accepted, ratified, and confirmed, as of April 10, 1900, and July 16, 1904, respectively.

Public land laws;  revenue

The existing laws of the United States relative to public lands shall not apply to such lands in the said islands of eastern Samoa;  but the Congress of the United States shall enact special laws for their management and disposition: Provided, That all revenue from or proceeds of the same, except as regards such part thereof as may be used or occupied for the civil, military, or naval purposes of the United States or may be assigned for the use of the local government, shall be used solely for the benefit of the inhabitants of the said islands of eastern Samoa for educational and other public purposes.

Government

Until Congress shall provide for the government of such islands, all civil, judicial, and military powers shall be vested in such person or persons and shall be exercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct;  and the President shall have power to remove said officers and fill the vacancies so occasioned.





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