31 U.S.C. § 5112 - U.S. Code - Unannotated Title 31. Money and Finance § 5112. Denominations, specifications, and design of coins




 The Secretary of the Treasury may mint and issue only the following coins:

 a dollar coin that is 1.043 inches in diameter.

 a half dollar coin that is 1.205 inches in diameter and weighs 11.34 grams.

 a quarter dollar coin that is 0.955 inch in diameter and weighs 5.67 grams.

 a dime coin that is 0.705 inch in diameter and weighs 2.268 grams.

 a 5-cent coin that is 0.835 inch in diameter and weighs 5 grams.

 except as provided under subsection (c) of this section, a one-cent coin that is 0.75 inch in diameter and weighs 3.11 grams.

 A fifty dollar gold coin that is 32.7 millimeters in diameter, weighs 33.931 grams, and contains one troy ounce of fine gold.

 A twenty-five dollar gold coin that is 27.0 millimeters in diameter, weighs 16.966 grams, and contains one-half troy ounce of fine gold.

 A ten dollar gold coin that is 22.0 millimeters in diameter, weighs 8.483 grams, and contains one-fourth troy ounce of fine gold.

 A five dollar gold coin that is 16.5 millimeters in diameter, weighs 3.393 grams, and contains one-tenth troy ounce of fine gold.

 A $50 gold coin that is of an appropriate size and thickness, as determined by the Secretary, weighs 1 ounce, and contains 99.99 percent pure gold.

 A $25 coin of an appropriate size and thickness, as determined by the Secretary, that weighs 1 troy ounce and contains .9995 fine palladium.

 The half dollar, quarter dollar, and dime coins are clad coins with 3 layers of metal.  The 2 identical outer layers are an alloy of 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel.  The inner layer is copper.  The outer layers are metallurgically bonded to the inner layer and weigh at least 30 percent of the weight of the coin.  The dollar coin shall be golden in color, have a distinctive edge, have tactile and visual features that make the denomination of the coin readily discernible, be minted and fabricated in the United States, and have similar metallic, anti-counterfeiting properties as United States coinage in circulation on the date of enactment of the United States $1 Coin Act of 1997.  The 5-cent coin is an alloy of 75 percent copper and 25 percent nickel.  In minting 5-cent coins, the Secretary shall use bars that vary not more than 2.5 percent from the percent of nickel required.  Except as provided under subsection (c) of this section, the one-cent coin is an alloy of 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc.  In minting gold coins, the Secretary shall use alloys that vary not more than 0.1 percent from the percent of gold required.  The specifications for alloys are by weight.

 The Secretary may prescribe the weight and the composition of copper and zinc in the alloy of the one-cent coin that the Secretary decides are appropriate when the Secretary decides that a different weight and alloy of copper and zinc are necessary to ensure an adequate supply of one-cent coins to meet the needs of the United States.

 United States coins shall have the inscription “In God We Trust”.  The obverse side of each coin shall have the inscription “Liberty”.  The reverse side of each coin shall have the inscriptions “United States of America” and “E Pluribus Unum” and a designation of the value of the coin.  The design on the reverse side of the dollar, half dollar, and quarter dollar is an eagle.  Subject to other provisions of this subsection, the obverse of any 5-cent coin issued after December 31, 2005, shall bear the likeness of Thomas Jefferson and the reverse of any such 5-cent coin shall bear an image of the home of Thomas Jefferson at Monticello.  The Secretary of the Treasury, in consultation with the Congress, shall select appropriate designs for the obverse and reverse sides of the dollar coin.  The coins have an inscription of the year of minting or issuance.  However, to prevent or alleviate a shortage of a denomination, the Secretary may inscribe coins of the denomination with the year that was last inscribed on coins of the denomination.

 The Secretary shall prepare the devices, models, hubs, and dies for coins, emblems, devices, inscriptions, and designs authorized under this chapter.  The Secretary may, after consulting with the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee and the Commission of Fine Arts, adopt and prepare new designs or models of emblems or devices that are authorized in the same way as when new coins or devices are authorized.  The Secretary may change the design or die of a coin only once within 25 years of the first adoption of the design, model, hub, or die for that coin.  The Secretary may procure services under section 3109 of title 5 in carrying out this paragraph.

 Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary shall mint and issue, in qualities and quantities that the Secretary determines are sufficient to meet public demand, coins which--

 are 40.6 millimeters in diameter and weigh 31.103 grams;

 contain .999 fine silver;

 have a design--

 symbolic of Liberty on the obverse side;  and

 of an eagle on the reverse side;

 have inscriptions of the year of minting or issuance, and the words “Liberty”, “In God We Trust”, “United States of America”, “1 Oz. Fine Silver”, “E Pluribus Unum”, and “One Dollar”;  and

 have reeded edges.

 Silver coins.--

 Sale price.--The Secretary shall sell the coins minted under subsection (e) to the public at a price equal to the market value of the bullion at the time of sale, plus the cost of minting, marketing, and distributing such coins (including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, and promotional and overhead expenses).

 Bulk sales.--The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins minted under subsection (e) at a reasonable discount.

 Numismatic items.--For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of this title, all coins minted under subsection (e) shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of this title, all coins minted under subsection (e) of this section shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 The coins issued under this title shall be legal tender as provided in section 5103 of this title.

 Notwithstanding section 5111(a)(1) of this title, the Secretary shall mint and issue the gold coins described in paragraphs (7), (8), (9), and (10) of subsection (a) of this section, in qualities and quantities that the Secretary determines are sufficient to meet public demand, and such gold coins shall--

 have a design determined by the Secretary, except that the fifty dollar gold coin shall have--

 on the obverse side, a design symbolic of Liberty;  and

 on the reverse side, a design representing a family of eagles, with the male carrying an olive branch and flying above a nest containing a female eagle and hatchlings;

 have inscriptions of the denomination, the weight of the fine gold content, the year of minting or issuance, and the words “Liberty”, “In God We Trust”, “United States of America”, and “E Pluribus Unum”;  and

 have reeded edges.

 The Secretary shall sell the coins minted under this subsection to the public at a price equal to the market value of the bullion at the time of sale, plus the cost of minting, marketing, and distributing such coins (including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, and promotional and overhead expenses).

 The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins minted under this subsection at a reasonable discount.

 For purposes of section 5132(a)(1) of this title, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Notwithstanding any other provision of law and subject to subparagraph (B), the Secretary of the Treasury may change the diameter, weight, or design of any coin minted under this subsection or the fineness of the gold in the alloy of any such coin if the Secretary determines that the specific diameter, weight, design, or fineness of gold which differs from that otherwise required by law is appropriate for such coin.

 The Secretary may not mint any coin with respect to which a determination has been made by the Secretary under subparagraph (A) before the end of the 30-day period beginning on the date a notice of such determination is published in the Federal Register.

 The Secretary may continue to mint and issue coins in accordance with the specifications contained in paragraphs (7), (8), (9), and (10) of subsection (a) and paragraph (1)(A) of this subsection at the same time the Secretary in minting and issuing other bullion and proof gold coins under this subsection in accordance with such program procedures and coin specifications, designs, varieties, quantities, denominations, and inscriptions as the Secretary, in the Secretary's discretion, may prescribe from time to time.

 General waiver of procurement regulations.--

 In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), no provision of law governing procurement or public contracts shall be applicable to the procurement of goods or services necessary for minting, marketing, or issuing any coin authorized under paragraph (7), (8), (9), or (10) of subsection (a) or subsection (e), including any proof version of any such coin.

 Equal employment opportunity.--Paragraph (1) shall not relieve any person entering into a contract with respect to any coin referred to in such paragraph from complying with any law relating to equal employment opportunity.

 The Secretary may mint and issue platinum bullion coins and proof platinum coins in accordance with such specifications, designs, varieties, quantities, denominations, and inscriptions as the Secretary, in the Secretary's discretion, may prescribe from time to time.

 Redesign and issuance of quarter dollar in commemoration of each of the 50 States.--

 Redesign beginning in 1999.--

 In general.--Notwithstanding the fourth sentence of subsection (d)(1) and subsection (d)(2), quarter dollar coins issued during the 10-year period beginning in 1999, shall have designs on the reverse side selected in accordance with this subsection which are emblematic of the 50 States.

 Transition provision.--Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), the Secretary may continue to mint and issue quarter dollars in 1999 which bear the design in effect before the redesign required under this subsection and an inscription of the year “1998” as required to ensure a smooth transition into the 10-year program under this subsection.

 Flexibility with regard to placement of inscriptions.--Notwithstanding subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may select a design for quarter dollars issued during the 10-year period referred to in subparagraph (A) in which--

 the inscription described in the second sentence of subsection (d)(1) appears on the reverse side of any such quarter dollars;  and

 any inscription described in the third sentence of subsection (d)(1) or the designation of the value of the coin appears on the obverse side of any such quarter dollars.

 Single state designs.--The design on the reverse side of each quarter dollar issued during the 10-year period referred to in paragraph (1) shall be emblematic of 1 of the 50 States.

 Issuance of coins commemorating 5 states during each of the 10 years.--

 In general.--The designs for the quarter dollar coins issued during each year of the 10-year period referred to in paragraph (1) shall be emblematic of 5 States selected in the order in which such States ratified the Constitution of the United States or were admitted into the Union, as the case may be.

 Number of each of 5 coin designs in each year.--Of the quarter dollar coins issued during each year of the 10-year period referred to in paragraph (1), the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, on the basis of such factors as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, the number of quarter dollars which shall be issued with each of the 5 designs selected for such year.

 Selection of design.--

 In general.--Each of the 50 designs required under this subsection for quarter dollars shall be--

 selected by the Secretary after consultation with--

 the Governor of the State being commemorated, or such other State officials or group as the State may designate for such purpose;  and

 the Commission of Fine Arts;  and

 reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.

 Selection and approval process.--Designs for quarter dollars may be submitted in accordance with the design selection and approval process developed by the Secretary in the sole discretion of the Secretary.

 Participation.--The Secretary may include participation by State officials, artists from the States, engravers of the United States Mint, and members of the general public.

 Standards.--Because it is important that the Nation's coinage and currency bear dignified designs of which the citizens of the United States can be proud, the Secretary shall not select any frivolous or inappropriate design for any quarter dollar minted under this subsection.

 Prohibition on certain representations.--No head and shoulders portrait or bust of any person, living or dead, and no portrait of a living person may be included in the design of any quarter dollar under this subsection.

 Treatment as numismatic items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Issuance.--

 Quality of coins.--The Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of each design selected under paragraph (4) in uncirculated and proof qualities as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Silver coins.--Notwithstanding subsection (b), the Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of each design selected under paragraph (4) as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, with a content of 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper.

 Sources of bullion.--The Secretary shall obtain silver for minting coins under subparagraph (B) from available resources, including stockpiles established under the Strategic and Critical Materials Stock Piling Act.

 Application in event of the admission of additional states.--If any additional State is admitted into the Union before the end of the 10-year period referred to in paragraph (1), the Secretary of the Treasury may issue quarter dollar coins, in accordance with this subsection, with a design which is emblematic of such State during any 1 year of such 10-year period, in addition to the quarter dollar coins issued during such year in accordance with paragraph (3)(A).

 Commemorative coin program restrictions.--

 Maximum number.--Beginning January 1, 1999, the Secretary may mint and issue commemorative coins under this section during any calendar year with respect to not more than 2 commemorative coin programs.

 Mintage levels.--

 In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), in carrying out any commemorative coin program, the Secretary shall mint--

 not more than 750,000 clad half-dollar coins;

 not more than 500,000 silver one-dollar coins;  and

 not more than 100,000 gold five-dollar or ten-dollar coins.

 Exception.--If the Secretary determines, based on independent, market-based research conducted by a designated recipient organization of a commemorative coin program, that the mintage levels described in subparagraph (A) are not adequate to meet public demand for that commemorative coin, the Secretary may waive one or more of the requirements of subparagraph (A) with respect to that commemorative coin program.

 Designated recipient organization defined.--For purposes of this paragraph, the term “designated recipient organization” means any organization designated, under any provision of law, as the recipient of any surcharge imposed on the sale of any numismatic item.

 Redesign and issuance of circulating $1 coins honoring each of the Presidents of the United States.--

 Redesign beginning in 2007.--Notwithstanding subsection (d) and in accordance with the provisions of this subsection, $1 coins issued during the period beginning January 1, 2007, and ending upon the termination of the program under paragraph (8), shall--

 have designs on the obverse selected in accordance with paragraph (2)(B) which are emblematic of the Presidents of the United States;  and

 have a design on the reverse selected in accordance with paragraph (2)(A).

 Design requirements.--The $1 coins issued in accordance with paragraph (1)(A) shall meet the following design requirements:

 Coin reverse.--The design on the reverse shall bear--

 a likeness of the Statue of Liberty extending to the rim of the coin and large enough to provide a dramatic representation of Liberty while not being large enough to create the impression of a “2-headed” coin;

 the inscription “$1”;  and

 the inscription “United States of America”.

 Coin obverse.--The design on the obverse shall contain--

 the name and likeness of a President of the United States;  and

 basic information about the President, including--

 the dates or years of the term of office of such President;  and

 a number indicating the order of the period of service in which the President served.

 Edge-incused inscriptions.--

 In general.--The inscription of the year of minting or issuance of the coin and the inscription “E Pluribus Unum” shall be edge-incused into the coin.

 Preservation of distinctive edge.--The edge-incusing of the inscriptions under clause (i) on coins issued under this subsection shall be done in a manner that preserves the distinctive edge of the coin so that the denomination of the coin is readily discernible, including by individuals who are blind or visually impaired.

 Inscriptions of “Liberty”.--Notwithstanding the second sentence of subsection (d)(1), because the use of a design bearing the likeness of the Statue of Liberty on the reverse of the coins issued under this subsection adequately conveys the concept of Liberty, the inscription of “Liberty” shall not appear on the coins.

 Limitation in series to deceased Presidents.--No coin issued under this subsection may bear the image of a living former or current President, or of any deceased former President during the 2-year period following the date of the death of that President.

 Inscription of “In God We Trust‘’.--The design on the obverse or the reverse shall bear the inscription “In God We Trust”.

 Issuance of coins commemorating Presidents.--

 Order of issuance.--The coins issued under this subsection commemorating Presidents of the United States shall be issued in the order of the period of service of each President, beginning with President George Washington.

 Treatment of period of service.--

 In general.--Subject to clause (ii), only 1 coin design shall be issued for a period of service for any President, no matter how many consecutive terms of office the President served.

 Nonconsecutive terms.--If a President has served during 2 or more nonconsecutive periods of service, a coin shall be issued under this subsection for each such nonconsecutive period of service.

 Issuance of coins commemorating 4 Presidents during each year of the period.--

 In general.--The designs for the $1 coins issued during each year of the period referred to in paragraph (1) shall be emblematic of 4 Presidents until each President has been so honored, subject to paragraph (2)(E).

 Number of 4 circulating coin designs in each year.--The Secretary shall prescribe, on the basis of such factors as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, the number of $1 coins that shall be issued with each of the designs selected for each year of the period referred to in paragraph (1).

 Legal tender.--The coins minted under this title shall be legal tender, as provided in section 5103.

 Treatment as numismatic items.--For purposes of section  [FN1] 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Issuance of numismatic coins.--The Secretary may mint and issue such number of $1 coins of each design selected under this subsection in uncirculated and proof qualities as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Termination of program.--The issuance of coins under this subsection shall terminate when each President has been so honored, subject to paragraph (2)(E), and may not be resumed except by an Act of Congress.

 Reversion to preceding design.--Upon the termination of the issuance of coins under this subsection, the design of all $1 coins shall revert to the so-called “Sacagawea-design” $1 coins.

 First Spouse Bullion Coin Program.--

 In general.--During the same period described in subsection (n), the Secretary shall issue bullion coins under this subsection that are emblematic of the spouse of each such President.

 Specifications.--The coins issued under this subsection shall--

 have the same diameter as the $1 coins described in subsection (n);

 weigh 0.5 ounce;  and

 contain 99.99 percent pure gold.

 Design requirements.--

 Coin obverse.--The design on the obverse of each coin issued under this subsection shall contain--

 the name and likeness of a person who was a spouse of a President during the President's period of service;

 an inscription of the years during which such person was the spouse of a President during the President's period of service;  and

 a number indicating the order of the period of service in which such President served.

 Coin reverse.--The design on the reverse of each coin issued under this subsection shall bear--

 images emblematic of the life and work of the First Spouse whose image is borne on the obverse;  and

 the inscription “United States of America”.

 Designated denomination.--Each coin issued under this subsection shall bear, on the reverse, an inscription of the nominal denomination of the coin which shall be “$10”.

 Design in case of no first spouse.--In the case of any President who served without a spouse--

 the image on the obverse of the bullion coin corresponding to the $1 coin relating to such President shall be an image emblematic of the concept of “Liberty”--

 as represented on a United States coin issued during the period of service of such President;  or

 as represented, in the case of President Chester Alan Arthur, by a design incorporating the name and likeness of Alice Paul, a leading strategist in the suffrage movement, who was instrumental in gaining women the right to vote upon the adoption of the 19th amendment and thus the ability to participate in the election of future Presidents, and who was born on January 11, 1885, during the term of President Arthur;  and

 the reverse of such bullion coin shall be of a design representative of themes of such President, except that in the case of the bullion coin referred to in clause (i)(II) the reverse of such coin shall be representative of the suffrage movement.

 Design and coin for each spouse.--A separate coin shall be designed and issued under this section for each person who was the spouse of a President during any portion of a term of office of such President.

 Inscriptions.--Each bullion coin issued under this subsection shall bear the inscription of the year of minting or issuance of the coin and such other inscriptions as the Secretary may determine to be appropriate.

 Sale of bullion coins.--Each bullion coin issued under this subsection shall be sold by the Secretary at a price that is equal to or greater than the sum of--

 the face value of the coins;  and

 the cost of designing and issuing the coins (including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses, marketing, and shipping).

 Issuance of coins commemorating First Spouses.--

 In general.--The bullion coins issued under this subsection with respect to any spouse of a President shall be issued on the same schedule as the $1 coin issued under subsection (n) with respect to each such President.

 Maximum number of bullion coins for each design.--The Secretary shall--

 prescribe, on the basis of such factors as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, the maximum number of bullion coins that shall be issued with each of the designs selected under this subsection;  and

 announce, before the issuance of the bullion coins of each such design, the maximum number of bullion coins of that design that will be issued.

 Termination of program.--No bullion coin may be issued under this subsection after the termination, in accordance with subsection (n)(8), of the $1 coin program established under subsection (n).

 Quality of coins.--The bullion coins minted under this Act shall be issued in both proof and uncirculated qualities.

 Source of gold bullion.--

 In general.--The Secretary shall acquire gold for the coins issued under this subsection by purchase of gold mined from natural deposits in the United States, or in a territory or possession of the United States, within 1 year after the month in which the ore from which it is derived was mined.

 Price of gold.--The Secretary shall pay not more than the average world price for the gold mined under subparagraph (A).

 Bronze medals.--The Secretary may strike and sell bronze medals that bear the likeness of the bullion coins authorized under this subsection, at a price, size, and weight, and with such inscriptions, as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Legal tender.--The coins minted under this title shall be legal tender, as provided in section 5103.

 Treatment as numismatic items.--For purposes of section  [FN1] 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Removal of barriers to circulation of $1 coin--

 Acceptance by agencies and instrumentalities.--Beginning January 1, 2006, all agencies and instrumentalities of the United States, the United States Postal Service, all nonappropriated fund instrumentalities established under title 10, United States Code, all transit systems that receive operational subsidies or any disbursement of funds from the Federal Government, such as funds from the Federal Highway Trust Fund, including the Mass Transit Account, and all entities that operate any business, including vending machines, on any premises owned by the United States or under the control of any agency or instrumentality of the United States, including the legislative and judicial branches of the Federal Government, shall take such action as may be appropriate to ensure that by the end of the 2-year period beginning on such date--

 any business operations conducted by any such agency, instrumentality, system, or entity that involve coins or currency will be fully capable of--

 accepting $1 coins in connection with such operations;  and

 other than vending machines that do not receive currency denominations higher than $1, dispensing $1 coins in connection with such operations;  and

 displays signs and notices denoting such capability on the premises where coins or currency are accepted or dispensed, including on each vending machine.

 Publicity.--The Director of the United States Mint, [FN2] shall work closely with consumer groups, media outlets, and schools to ensure an adequate amount of news coverage, and other means of increasing public awareness, of the inauguration of the Presidential $1 Coin Program established in subsection (n) to ensure that consumers know of the availability of the coin.

 Coordination.--The Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Secretary shall take steps to ensure that an adequate supply of $1 coins is available for commerce and collectors at such places and in such quantities as are appropriate by--

 consulting, to accurately gauge demand for coins and to anticipate and eliminate obstacles to the easy and efficient distribution and circulation of $1 coins as well as all other circulating coins, from time to time but no less frequently than annually, with a coin users group, which may include--

 representatives of merchants who would benefit from the increased usage of $1 coins;

 vending machine and other coin acceptor manufacturers;

 vending machine owners and operators;

 transit officials;

 municipal parking officials;

 depository institutions;

 coin and currency handlers;

 armored-car operators;

 car wash operators;  and

 coin collectors and dealers;

 submitting an annual report to the Congress containing--

 an assessment of the remaining obstacles to the efficient and timely circulation of coins, particularly $1 coins;

 an assessment of the extent to which the goals of subparagraph (C) are being met;  and

 such recommendations for legislative action the Board and the Secretary may determine to be appropriate;

 consulting with industry representatives to encourage operators of vending machines and other automated coin-accepting devices in the United States to accept coins issued under the Presidential $1 Coin Program established under subsection (n) and any coins bearing any design in effect before the issuance of coins required under subsection (n) (including the so-called “Sacagawea-design” $1 coins), and to include notices on the machines and devices of such acceptability;

 ensuring that--

 during an introductory period, all institutions that want unmixed supplies of each newly-issued design of $1 coins minted under subsections (n) and (o) are able to obtain such unmixed supplies;  and

 circulating coins will be available for ordinary commerce in packaging of sizes and types appropriate for and useful to ordinary commerce, including rolled coins;

 working closely with any agency, instrumentality, system, or entity referred to in paragraph (1) to facilitate compliance with the requirements of such paragraph;  and

 identifying, analyzing, and overcoming barriers to the robust circulation of $1 coins minted under subsections (n) and (o), including the use of demand prediction, improved methods of distribution and circulation, and improved public education and awareness campaigns.

 Bullion dealers.--The Director of the United States Mint shall take all steps necessary to ensure that a maximum number of reputable, reliable, and responsible dealers are qualified to offer for sale all bullion coins struck and issued by the United States Mint.

 Review of co-circulation.--At such time as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, and after consultation with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Secretary shall notify the Congress of its assessment of issues related to the co-circulation of any circulating $1 coin bearing any design, other than the so-called “Sacagawea-design” $1 coin, in effect before the issuance of coins required under subsection (n), including the effect of co-circulation on the acceptance and use of $1 coins, and make recommendations to the Congress for improving the circulation of $1 coins.

 Gold bullion coins.--

 In general.--Not later than 6 months after the date of enactment of the Presidential $1 Coin Act of 2005, the Secretary shall commence striking and issuing for sale such number of $50 gold bullion and proof coins as the Secretary may determine to be appropriate, in such quantities, as the Secretary, in the Secretary's discretion, may prescribe.

 Initial design.--

 In general.--Except as provided under subparagraph (B), the obverse and reverse of the gold bullion coins struck under this subsection during the first year of issuance shall bear the original designs by James Earle Fraser, which appear on the 5-cent coin commonly referred to as the “Buffalo nickel” or the “1913 Type 1”.

 Variations.--The coins referred to in subparagraph (A) shall--

 have inscriptions of the weight of the coin and the nominal denomination of the coin incused in that portion of the design on the reverse of the coin commonly known as the “grassy mound”;  and

 bear such other inscriptions as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Source of gold bullion.--

 In general.--The Secretary shall acquire gold for the coins issued under this subsection by purchase of gold mined from natural deposits in the United States, or in a territory or possession of the United States, within 1 year after the month in which the ore from which it is derived was mined.

 Price of gold.--The Secretary shall pay not more than the average world price for the gold mined under subparagraph (A).

 Sale of coins.--Each gold bullion coin issued under this subsection shall be sold for an amount the Secretary determines to be appropriate, but not less than the sum of--

 the market value of the bullion at the time of sale;  and

 the cost of designing and issuing the coins, including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses, marketing, and shipping.

 Legal tender.--The coins minted under this title shall be legal tender, as provided in section 5103.

 Treatment as numismatic items.--For purposes of section  [FN1] 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Redesign and issuance of circulating $1 coins honoring Native Americans and the important contributions made by Indian tribes and individual Native Americans in United States history.--

 Redesign beginning in 2008.--

 In general.--Effective beginning January 1, 2008, notwithstanding subsection (d), in addition to the coins to be issued pursuant to subsection (n), and in accordance with this subsection, the Secretary shall mint and issue $1 coins that--

 have as the designs on the obverse the so-called “Sacagawea design”;  and

 have a design on the reverse selected in accordance with paragraph (2)(A), subject to paragraph (3)(A).

 Delayed date.--If the date of the enactment of the Native American $1 Coin Act is after August 25, 2007, subparagraph (A) shall be applied by substituting “2009” for “2008”.

 Design requirements.--The $1 coins issued in accordance with paragraph (1) shall meet the following design requirements:

 Coin reverse.--The design on the reverse shall bear--

 images celebrating the important contributions made by Indian tribes and individual Native Americans to the development of the United States and the history of the United States;

 the inscription “$1”;  and

 the inscription “United States of America”.

 Coin obverse.--The design on the obverse shall--

 be chosen by the Secretary, after consultation with the Commission of Fine Arts and review by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee;  and

 contain the so-called “Sacagawea design” and the inscription “Liberty”.

 Edge-incused inscriptions.--

 In general.--The inscription of the year of minting and issuance of the coin and the inscription “E Pluribus Unum” shall be edge-incused into the coin.

 Preservation of distinctive edge.--The edge-incusing of the inscriptions under clause (i) on coins issued under this subsection shall be done in a manner that preserves the distinctive edge of the coin so that the denomination of the coin is readily discernible, including by individuals who are blind or visually impaired.

 Reverse design selection.--The designs selected for the reverse of the coins described under this subsection--

 shall be chosen by the Secretary after consultation with the Committee on Indian Affairs of the Senate, the Congressional Native American Caucus of the House of Representatives, the Commission of Fine Arts, and the National Congress of American Indians;

 shall be reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee;

 may depict individuals and events such as--

 the creation of Cherokee written language;

 the Iroquois Confederacy;

 Wampanoag Chief Massasoit;

 the “Pueblo Revolt”;

 Olympian Jim Thorpe;

 Ely S. Parker, a general on the staff of General Ulysses S. Grant and later head of the Bureau of Indian Affairs;  and

 code talkers who served the United States Armed Forces during World War I and World War II;  and

 in the case of a design depicting the contribution of an individual Native American to the development of the United States and the history of the United States, shall not depict the individual in a size such that the coin could be considered to be a “2-headed” coin.

 Inscription of “In God We Trust”.--The design on the obverse or the reverse shall bear the inscription “In God We Trust”.

 Issuance of coins commemorating 1 Native American event during each year.--

 In general.--Each design for the reverse of the $1 coins issued during each year shall be emblematic of 1 important Native American or Native American contribution each year.

 Issuance period.--Each $1 coin minted with a design on the reverse in accordance with this subsection for any year shall be issued during the 1-year period beginning on January 1 of that year and shall be available throughout the entire 1-year period.

 Order of issuance of designs.--Each coin issued under this subsection commemorating Native Americans and their contributions--

 shall be issued, to the maximum extent practicable, in the chronological order in which the Native Americans lived or the events occurred, until the termination of the coin program described in subsection (n);  and

 thereafter shall be issued in any order determined to be appropriate by the Secretary, after consultation with the Committee on Indian Affairs of the Senate, the Congressional Native American Caucus of the House of Representatives, and the National Congress of American Indians.

 Issuance of numismatic coins.--The Secretary may mint and issue such number of $1 coins of each design selected under this subsection in uncirculated and proof qualities as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Quantity.--The number of $1 coins minted and issued in a year with the Sacagawea-design on the obverse shall be not less than 20 percent of the total number of $1 coins minted and issued in such year.

 Redesign and issuance of circulating quarter dollar honoring the District of Columbia and each of the territories.--

 Redesign in 2009.--

 In general.--Notwithstanding the fourth sentence of subsection (d)(1) and subsection (d)(2) and subject to paragraph (6)(B), quarter dollar coins issued during 2009, shall have designs on the reverse side selected in accordance with this subsection which are emblematic of the District of Columbia and the territories.

 Flexibility with regard to placement of inscriptions.--Notwithstanding subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may select a design for quarter dollars issued during 2009 in which--

 the inscription described in the second sentence of subsection (d)(1) appears on the reverse side of any such quarter dollars;  and

 any inscription described in the third sentence of subsection (d)(1) or the designation of the value of the coin appears on the obverse side of any such quarter dollars.

 Single district or territory design.--The design on the reverse side of each quarter dollar issued during 2009 shall be emblematic of one of the following:  The District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

 Selection of design.--

 In general.--Each of the 6 designs required under this subsection for quarter dollars shall be--

 selected by the Secretary after consultation with--

 the chief executive of the District of Columbia or the territory being honored, or such other officials or group as the chief executive officer of the District of Columbia or the territory may designate for such purpose;  and

 the Commission of Fine Arts;  and

 reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.

 Selection and approval process.--Designs for quarter dollars may be submitted in accordance with the design selection and approval process developed by the Secretary in the sole discretion of the Secretary.

 Participation.--The Secretary may include participation by District or territorial officials, artists from the District of Columbia or the territory, engravers of the United States Mint, and members of the general public.

 Standards.--Because it is important that the Nation's coinage and currency bear dignified designs of which the citizens of the United States can be proud, the Secretary shall not select any frivolous or inappropriate design for any quarter dollar minted under this subsection.

 Prohibition on certain representations.--No head and shoulders portrait or bust of any person, living or dead, and no portrait of a living person may be included in the design of any quarter dollar under this subsection.

 Treatment as numismatic items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Issuance.--

 Quality of coins.--The Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of each design selected under paragraph (3) in uncirculated and proof qualities as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Silver coins.--Notwithstanding subsection (b), the Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of each design selected under paragraph (3) as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, with a content of 90 percent silver and 10 percent copper.

 Timing and order of issuance.--Coins minted under this subsection honoring the District of Columbia and each of the territories shall be issued in equal sequential intervals during 2009 in the following order:  the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

 Other provisions.--

 Application in event of admission as a state.--If the District of Columbia or any territory becomes a State before the end of the 10-year period referred to in subsection (l)(1), subsection (l)(7) shall apply, and this subsection shall not apply, with respect to such State.

 Application in event of independence.--If any territory becomes independent or otherwise ceases to be a territory or possession of the United States before quarter dollars bearing designs which are emblematic of such territory are minted pursuant to this subsection, this subsection shall cease to apply with respect to such territory.

 Territory defined.--For purposes of this subsection, the term “territory” means the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the United States Virgin Islands, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

 Redesign and issuance of quarter dollars emblematic of national sites in each state, the District of Columbia, and each territory.--

 Redesign beginning upon completion of prior program.--

 In general.--Notwithstanding the fourth sentence of subsection (d)(1) and subsection (d)(2), quarter dollars issued beginning in 2010 shall have designs on the reverse selected in accordance with this subsection which are emblematic of the national sites in the States, the District of Columbia and the territories of the United States.

 Flexibility with regard to placement of inscriptions.--Notwithstanding subsection (d)(1), the Secretary may select a design for quarter dollars referred to in subparagraph (A) in which--

 the inscription described in the second sentence of subsection (d)(1) appears on the reverse side of any such quarter dollars;  and

 any inscription described in the third sentence of subsection (d)(1) or the designation of the value of the coin appears on the obverse side of any such quarter dollars.

 Inclusion of District of Columbia, and territories.--For purposes of this subsection, the term ‘State’ has the same meaning as in section 3(a)(3) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act.

 Single site in each State.--The design on the reverse side of each quarter dollar issued during the period of issuance under this subsection shall be emblematic of 1 national site in each State.

 Selection of site and design.--

 Site.--

 In general.--The selection of a national park or other national site in each State to be honored with a coin under this subsection shall be made by the Secretary of the Treasury, after consultation with the Secretary of the Interior and the governor or other chief executive of each State with respect to which a coin is to be issued under this subsection, and after giving full and thoughtful consideration to national sites that are not under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Interior so that the national site chosen for each State shall be the most appropriate in terms of natural or historic significance.

 Timing.--The selection process under clause (i) shall be completed before the end of the 270-day period beginning on the date of the enactment of the America's Beautiful National Parks Quarter Dollar Coin Act of 2008.

 Design.--Each of the designs required under this subsection for quarter dollars shall be--

 selected by the Secretary after consultation with--

 the Secretary of the Interior;  and

 the Commission of Fine Arts;  and

 reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.

 Selection and approval process.--Recommendations for site selections and designs for quarter dollars may be submitted in accordance with the site and design selection and approval process developed by the Secretary in the sole discretion of the Secretary.

 Participation in design.--The Secretary may include participation by officials of the State, artists from the State, engravers of the United States Mint, and members of the general public.

 Standards.--Because it is important that the Nation's coinage and currency bear dignified designs of which the citizens of the United States can be proud, the Secretary shall not select any frivolous or inappropriate design for any quarter dollar minted under this subsection.

 Prohibition on certain representations.--No head and shoulders portrait or bust of any person, living or dead, no portrait of a living person, and no outline or map of a State may be included in the design on the reverse of any quarter dollar under this subsection.

 Issuance of coins.--

 Order of issuance.--The quarter dollar coins issued under this subsection bearing designs of national sites shall be issued in the order in which the sites selected under paragraph (3) were first established as a national site.

 Rate of issuance.--The quarter dollar coins bearing designs of national sites under this subsection shall be issued at the rate of 5 new designs during each year of the period of issuance under this subsection.

 Number of each of 5 coin designs in each year.--Of the quarter dollar coins issued during each year of the period of issuance, the Secretary of the Treasury shall prescribe, on the basis of such factors as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, the number of quarter dollars which shall be issued with each of the designs selected for such year.

 Treatment as numismatic items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Issuance.--

 Quality of coins.--The Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of each design selected under paragraph (3) in uncirculated and proof qualities as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

 Silver coins.--Notwithstanding subsection (b), the Secretary may mint and issue such number of quarter dollars of each design selected under paragraph (3) as the Secretary determines to be appropriate, with a content of not less than 90 percent silver.

 Period of issuance.--

 In general.--Subject to paragraph (2), the program established under this subsection shall continue in effect until a national site in each State has been honored.

 Second round at discretion of Secretary.--

 Determination.--The Secretary may make a determination before the end of the 9-year period beginning when the first quarter dollar is issued under this subsection to continue the period of issuance until a second national site in each State, the District of Columbia, and each territory referred to in this subsection has been honored with a design on a quarter dollar.

 Notice and report.--Within 30 days after making a determination under clause (i), the Secretary shall submit a written report on such determination to the Committee on Financial Services of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the Senate.

 Applicability of provisions.--If the Secretary makes a determination under clause (i), the provisions of this subsection applicable to site and design selection and approval, the order, timing, and conditions of issuance shall apply in like manner as the initial issuance of quarter dollars under this subsection, except that the issuance of quarter dollars pursuant to such determination bearing the first design shall commence in order immediately following the last issuance of quarter dollars under the first round.

 Continuation until all States are honored.--If the Secretary makes a determination under clause (i), the program under this subsection shall continue until a second site in each State has been so honored.

 Designs after end of program.--Upon the completion of the coin program under this subsection, the design on--

 the obverse of the quarter dollar shall revert to the same design containing an image of President Washington in effect for the quarter dollar before the institution of the 50-State quarter dollar program;  and

 notwithstanding the fourth sentence of subsection (d)(1), the reverse of the quarter dollar shall contain an image of General Washington crossing the Delaware River prior to the Battle of Trenton.

 National site.--For purposes of this subsection, the term “national site” means any site under the supervision, management, or conservancy of the National Park Service, the United States Forest Service, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, or any similar department or agency of the Federal Government, including any national park, national monument, national battlefield, national military park, national historical park, national historic site, national lakeshore, seashore, recreation area, parkway, scenic river, or trail and any site in the National Wildlife Refuge System.

 Application in event of independence.--If any territory becomes independent or otherwise ceases to be a territory or possession of the United States before quarter dollars bearing designs which are emblematic of such territory are minted pursuant to this subsection, this subsection shall cease to apply with respect to such territory.

 Silver bullion investment product.--

 In general.--The Secretary shall strike and make available for sale such number of bullion coins as the Secretary determines to be appropriate that are likenesses of the quarter dollars issued under subsection (t), each of which shall--

 have a diameter determined by the Secretary that is no less than 2.5 inches and no greater than 3.0 inches and weigh 5.0 ounces;

 contain .999 fine silver;

 bear an inscription of the denomination of such coin, which shall be “quarter dollar”;  and

 not be minted or issued by the United States Mint as so-called “fractional” bullion coins or in any size other than the size described in paragraph (A).

[ Redesignated (D)]

 Availability for sale.--Bullion coins minted under paragraph (1)--

 shall become available for sale no sooner than the first day of the calendar year in which the circulating quarter dollar of which such bullion coin is a duplicate is issued;  and

 may only be available for sale during the year in which such circulating quarter dollar is issued.

 Distribution.--

 In general.--In addition to the authorized dealers utilized by the Secretary in distributing bullion coins and solely for purposes of distributing bullion coins issued under this subsection, the Director of the National Park Service, or the designee of the Director, may purchase numismatic items issued under this subsection, but only in units of no fewer than 1,000 at a time, and the Director, or the Director's designee, may resell or repackage such numismatic items as the Director determines to be appropriate.

 Resale.--The Director of the National Park Service, or the designee of the Director, may resell, at cost and without repackaging, numismatic items acquired by the Director or such designee under subparagraph (A) to any party affiliated with any national site honored by a quarter dollar under subsection (t) for repackaging and resale by such party in the same manner and to the same extent as such party would be authorized to engage in such activities under subparagraph (A) if the party were acting as the designee of the Director under such subparagraph.

 Palladium bullion investment coins.--

 In general.--The Secretary shall mint and issue the palladium coins described in paragraph (12) of subsection (a) in such quantities as the Secretary may determine to be appropriate to meet demand.

 Source of bullion.--

 In general.--To the greatest extent possible, the Secretary shall acquire bullion for the palladium coins issued under this subsection by purchase of palladium mined from natural deposits in the United States, or in a territory or possession of the United States, within 1 year after the month in which the ore from which it is derived was mined.  If no such palladium is available or if it is not economically feasible to obtain such palladium, the Secretary may obtain palladium for the palladium coins described in paragraph (12) of subsection (a) from other available sources.

 Price of bullion.--The Secretary shall pay not more than the average world price for the palladium under subparagraph (A).

 Sale of coins.--Each coin issued under this subsection shall be sold for an amount the Secretary determines to be appropriate, but not less than the sum of--

 the market value of the bullion at the time of sale;  and

 the cost of designing and issuing the coins, including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses, marketing, distribution, and shipping.

 Treatment.--For purposes of section 5134 and 5136, all coins minted under this subsection shall be considered to be numismatic items.

 Quality.--The Secretary may issue collectible versions of the coins described in paragraph (1) in both proof and uncirculated versions, except that, should the Secretary determine that it is appropriate to issue proof or uncirculated versions of such coin, the Secretary shall, to the greatest extent possible, ensure that the surface treatment of each year's proof or uncirculated version differs in some material way from that of the preceding year.

 Design.--Coins minted and issued under this subsection shall bear designs on the obverse and reverse that are close likenesses of the work of famed American coin designer and medallic artist Adolph Alexander Weinman--

 the obverse shall bear a high-relief likeness of the ‘Winged Liberty’ design used on the obverse of the so-called ‘Mercury dime’;

 the reverse shall bear a high-relief version of the reverse design of the 1907 American Institute of Architects medal;  and

 the coin shall bear such other inscriptions, including “Liberty”, “In God We Trust”, “United States of America”, the denomination and weight of the coin and the fineness of the metal, as the Secretary determines to be appropriate and in keeping with the original design.

 Mint facility.--Any United States mint, other than the United States Mint at West Point, New York, may be used to strike coins minted under this subsection other than any proof version of any such coin.  If the Secretary determines that it is appropriate to issue any proof version of such coin, coins of such version shall be struck only at the United States Mint at West Point, New York.

[FN1]

 So in original.  Probably should be “sections”.

[FN2]

 So in original.  The comma probably should not appear.


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