Texas Transportation Code - TRANSP § 724.017. Taking of Blood Specimen




(a) Only the following may take a blood specimen at the request or order of a peace officer under this chapter:

(1) a physician;

(2) a qualified technician;

(3) a registered professional nurse;

(4) a licensed vocational nurse;  or

(5) a licensed or certified emergency medical technician-intermediate or emergency medical technician-paramedic authorized to take a blood specimen under Subsection (c).

(a-1) The blood specimen must be taken in a sanitary place.

(b) If the blood specimen was taken according to recognized medical procedures, the person who takes the blood specimen under this chapter, the facility that employs the person who takes the blood specimen, or the hospital where the blood specimen is taken is immune from civil liability for damages arising from the taking of the blood specimen at the request or order of the peace officer or pursuant to a search warrant as provided by this chapter and is not subject to discipline by any licensing or accrediting agency or body.  This subsection does not relieve a person from liability for negligence in the taking of a blood specimen.  The taking of a specimen from a person who objects to the taking of the specimen or who is resisting the taking of the specimen does not in itself constitute negligence and may not be considered evidence of negligence.

(c) A licensed or certified emergency medical technician-intermediate or emergency medical technician-paramedic may take a blood specimen only if authorized by the medical director for the entity that employs the technician-intermediate or technician-paramedic.  The specimen must be taken according to a protocol developed by the medical director that provides direction to the technician-intermediate or technician-paramedic for the taking of a blood specimen at the request or order of a peace officer.  In this subsection, “medical director” means a licensed physician who supervises the provision of emergency medical services by a public or private entity that:

(1) provides those services;  and

(2) employs one or more licensed or certified emergency medical technician-intermediates or emergency medical technician-paramedics.

(c-1) A protocol developed under Subsection (c) may address whether an emergency medical technician-intermediate or emergency medical technician-paramedic engaged in the performance of official duties is entitled to refuse to:

(1) go to the location of a person from whom a peace officer requests or orders the taking of a blood specimen solely for the purpose of taking that blood specimen;

(2) take a blood specimen if the technician-intermediate or technician-paramedic reasonably believes that complying with the peace officer's request or order to take the specimen would impair or interfere with the provision of patient care or the performance of other official duties;  or

(3) provide the equipment or supplies necessary to take a blood specimen.

(c-2) If a licensed or certified emergency medical technician-intermediate or emergency medical technician-paramedic takes a blood specimen at the request or order of a peace officer, a peace officer must:

(1) observe the taking of the specimen;  and

(2) immediately take possession of the specimen for purposes of establishing a chain of custody.

(d) A person whose blood specimen is taken under this chapter in a hospital is not considered to be present in the hospital for medical screening or treatment unless the appropriate hospital personnel determine that medical screening or treatment is required for proper medical care of the person.





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