New York Civil Practice Law and Rules § 2308. Disobedience of subpoena




(a) Judicial.  Failure to comply with a subpoena issued by a judge, clerk or officer of the court shall be punishable as a contempt of court.  If the witness is a party the court may also strike his or her pleadings.  A subpoenaed person shall also be liable to the person on whose behalf the subpoena was issued for a penalty not exceeding one hundred fifty dollars and damages sustained by reason of the failure to comply.  A court may issue a warrant directing a sheriff to bring the witness into court.  If a person so subpoenaed attends or is brought into court, but refuses without reasonable cause to be examined, or to answer a legal and pertinent question, or to produce a book, paper or other thing which he or she was directed to produce by the subpoena, or to subscribe his or her deposition after it has been correctly reduced to writing, the court may forthwith issue a warrant directed to the sheriff of the county where the person is, committing him or her to jail, there to remain until he or she submits to do the act which he or she was so required to do or is discharged according to law.  Such a warrant of commitment shall specify particularly the cause of the commitment and, if the witness is committed for refusing to answer a question, the question shall be inserted in the warrant.

(b) Non-judicial.  (1) Unless otherwise provided, if a person fails to comply with a subpoena which is not returnable in a court, the issuer or the person on whose behalf the subpoena was issued may move in the supreme court to compel compliance.  If the court finds that the subpoena was authorized, it shall order compliance and may impose costs not exceeding fifty dollars.  A subpoenaed person shall also be liable to the person on whose behalf the subpoena was issued for a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars and damages sustained by reason of the failure to comply.  A court may issue a warrant directing a sheriff to bring the witness before the person or body requiring his appearance.  If a person so subpoenaed attends or is brought before such person or body, but refuses without reasonable cause to be examined, or to answer a legal and pertinent question, or to produce a book, paper or other thing which he was directed to produce by the subpoena, or to subscribe his deposition after it has been correctly reduced to writing, the court, upon proof by affidavit, may issue a warrant directed to the sheriff of the county where the person is, committing him to jail, there to remain until he submits to do the act which he was so required to do or is discharged according to law.  Such a warrant of commitment shall specify particularly the cause of the commitment and, if the witness is committed for refusing to answer a question, the question shall be inserted in the warrant.

(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of paragraph one of this subdivision, if a person fails to comply with a subpoena issued pursuant to section one hundred eleven-p of the social services law by the office of temporary and disability assistance or a social services district, or its authorized representative, or another state's child support enforcement agency governed by title IV-D of the social security act, such office or district is authorized to impose a penalty against the subpoenaed person.  The amount of the penalty shall be determined by the commissioner of the office of temporary and disability assistance and set forth in regulation, and shall not exceed fifty dollars.  Payment of the penalty shall not be required, however, if in response to notification of the imposition of the penalty the subpoenaed person complies immediately with the subpoena.

(c) Review of proceedings.  Within ninety days after the offender shall have been committed to jail he shall, if not then discharged by law, be brought, by the sheriff, or other officer, as a matter of course personally before the court issuing the warrant of commitment and a review of the proceedings shall then be held to determine whether the offender shall be discharged from commitment.  At periodic intervals of not more than ninety days following such review, the offender, if not then discharged by law from such commitment, shall be brought, by the sheriff, or other officer, personally before the court issuing the warrant of commitment and further reviews of the proceedings shall then be held to determine whether he shall be discharged from commitment.  The clerk of the court before which such review of the proceedings shall be held, or the judge or justice of such court in case there be no clerk, shall give reasonable notice in writing of the date, time and place of each such review to each party or his attorney who shall have appeared of record in the proceeding resulting in the issuance of the warrant of commitment, at their last known address.


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