Kentucky Revised Statutes Title L. Kentucky Penal Code § 514.030. Theft by unlawful taking or disposition;  penalties




(1)  Except as otherwise provided in KRS 217.181, a person is guilty of theft by unlawful taking or disposition when he unlawfully:

(a) Takes or exercises control over movable property of another with intent to deprive him thereof;  or

(b) Obtains immovable property of another or any interest therein with intent to benefit himself or another not entitled thereto.

(2)  Theft by unlawful taking or disposition is a Class A misdemeanor unless:

(a) The property is a firearm (regardless of the value of the firearm), in which case it is a Class D felony;

(b) The property is anhydrous ammonia (regardless of the value of the ammonia), in which case it is a Class D felony unless it is proven that the person violated this section with the intent to manufacture methamphetamine in violation of KRS 218A.1432, in which case it is a Class B felony for the first offense and a Class A felony for each subsequent offense;

(c) The property is one (1) or more controlled substances valued collectively at less than ten thousand dollars ($10,000), in which case it is a Class D felony;

(d) The value of the property is five hundred dollars ($500) or more but less than ten thousand dollars ($10,000), in which case it is a Class D felony;

(e) The value of the property is ten thousand dollars ($10,000) or more but less than one million dollars ($1,000,000), in which case it is a Class C felony;

(f) The value of the property is one million dollars ($1,000,000) or more but less than ten million dollars ($10,000,000), in which case it is a Class B felony;  or

(g) The value of the property is ten million dollars ($10,000,000) or more, in which case it is a Class B felony.

(3)  Any person convicted under subsection (2)(g) of this section shall not be released on probation or parole until he or she has served at least fifty percent (50%) of the sentence imposed, any statute to the contrary notwithstanding.


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