Arizona Revised Statutes Title 17. Game and Fish § 17-320. Jaguar;  protection;  violation;  classification;  civil liability;  exception




A. Notwithstanding § 17-239 or any other provision of this title, if the secretary of the interior publishes in the federal register a determination for the removal of jaguar (felis onca) from the list as required under § 4(c) of the endangered species act of 1973, as amended, ( P.L. 93-205 ;  87 Stat. 884;   16 United States Code §§ 1531 through 1544 ):

1. It is unlawful for a person to knowingly kill, wound or possess a jaguar or any part thereof.

2. A person who unlawfully kills, wounds or possesses a jaguar or any part thereof:

(a) Is guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor.

(b) Is liable for civil damages of not more than seventy-two thousand five hundred dollars for each violation pursuant to procedures set forth in § 17-314 .

B. Subsection A of this section does not apply to:

1. A jaguar or parts of a jaguar that were lawfully possessed under state and federal law before August 21, 1997.

2. Any person who kills or wounds a jaguar, if it can be shown by a preponderance of the evidence that the person committed an act based on a good faith belief that the person was acting to protect himself, a member of the person's family or any other individual from bodily harm from a jaguar.

C. A person shall notify the department within five days after killing or wounding a jaguar under subsection B, paragraph 2 of this section.  A jaguar killed or wounded pursuant to subsection B, paragraph 2 of this section shall not be retained, sold or removed from the site without authorization from the department.





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